Saturday, March 25, 2017

Why I became a mystery writer


by Patricia Gligor

My Malone mystery series has been an important part of my life for many years. The release of the first book, Mixed Messages, and the subsequent publication of Unfinished Business, Desperate Deeds, Mistaken Identity and, finally, Marnie Malone, has been a dream come true. My characters are people I’ve come to know and love.

My series is character driven. What that means (for non-writers) is that my characters are the most important element in my books. Plot is important, of course, as is setting but, to me, knowing why my characters say and do what they say and do is of utmost importance.

Which brings me to the topic of this post: Why I became a mystery writer. What motivated me to choose to write in the first place? And, why mystery/suspense novels?

To answer those questions, we’re going to take a trip back in time.
I grew up in a big, old house with lots of nooks and crannies to explore and a woods behind it stretching as far as the eye could see. There was a small cemetery at the top of the hill in those woods. So eerie and mysterious! The perfect setting for a young girl with an active imagination who loved to read Judy Bolton and Nancy Drew mysteries.

I used to make up stories about what was happening (and had happened) in the house and the woods and I told them to my brother and two of our playmates. They were all younger than me and I know I frightened them with my tales of mystery and suspense.

When I was ten years old, I wrote a poem called “The Night” and submitted it to my Sunday school magazine. To my amazement (and delight), it was published! When I saw my name printed under the title, I was hooked for life. I didn’t know how and I didn’t know when but I did know that someday I would be an author. Deciding which genre to write in wasn’t a problem for me. I knew I wanted to write mysteries.


A lot of years have passed since then but I remember myself as a child who was excited to write mysteries and who would go off to be alone to daydream. That little girl is still inside me and she still sees mystery everywhere!

Blurb for Marnie Malone


Someone is stalking Marnie.

It’s Marnie’s last week at the law firm of Cliburn & Reeves and she feels like she’s riding an emotional roller coaster. Up when she wins the divorce and custody battle for Callie Jackson against her abusive husband, Jed. And plummeting down when one witness after another decides not to testify against Mark Hall, an attorney at another Charleston firm and an “alleged” serial rapist.

Marnie receives one threat after another and she constantly feels the need to look over her shoulder, convinced that someone is stalking her. With Sam out of town on business, she’s alone in the big, old farmhouse and strange things are happening. Noises in the attic, creaking floorboards and someone watching her from the woods.

As she tries to determine the identity of the stalker, the list of men who have grudges against her grows longer each day. In her line of work she’s made enemies. Is the stalker someone from the past or one of the men on her list? And, how far will he go?

About the Author:

Patricia Gligor is a Cincinnati native. She enjoys reading mystery/suspense novels, touring and photographing old houses and traveling. She has worked as an administrative assistant, the sole proprietor of a resume writing service and the manager of a sporting goods department but her passion has always been writing fiction.
Ms. Gligor writes the Malone Mystery series. The first three books, Mixed Messages, Unfinished Business, and Desperate Deeds take place in Cincinnati but in Mistaken Identity, the fourth book, her characters are vacationing on Fripp Island in South Carolina. Marnie Malone, the fifth book in her series, is also set in South Carolina.

Her books are available at:

Visit her website at: http://pat-writersforum.blogspot.com/

15 comments:

Patricia Gligor said...

Jean,
Thanks so much for inviting me to be your guest.

Palmaltas said...

What an interesting childhood you had and how wonderful that it inspired you to be a mystery writer.

Evelyn Cullet said...

Sounds like you had a childhood that could almost set you up to be a mystery writer. I'm nearly finished reading Marnie Malone. I usually read in bed before I go to sleep, but I can't read this novel at that time because I'm so worried about your main character that it'll give me nightmares. So chilling. Hope to finish it soon.

Patricia Gligor said...

Pat,
We lived in that house until I was 12 1/2 years old and I'm very grateful for the years I had there. Then, we moved to a subdivision in another school district, which was where I spent my teenage years. And that's a whole other story. LOL

Patricia Gligor said...

Thanks, Evelyn. Sounds like I hooked you and, as you well know, that's "gold" to we writers.

Marja said...

Well, you hooked me, too. I finished the book and I highly recommend it! Lots of suspense and memorable characters, which is both good and bad (as in bad guys). Loved it!

Like you, as a child I was always finding mysteries in my surroundings. Bet we had more fun than most kids. : )

jrlindermuth said...

That first byline (no matter at what age) is a clincher. You had yours earlier than me, though I did make a news appearance at age 10 for my drawings. Marnie is on my TBR list, but haven't got to it yet. So many books, so little time. And now Marja has another Bogie coming out.

Linda Thorne said...

Loved hearing about your background as a child. Mine was all in the city and I used to dream of being near woods. Even a graveyard. Great book synopsis.

Jean Henry Mead said...

It's good to have you back, Pat, I can't wait to read your latest novel.

Patricia Gligor said...

Marja,
You're right. Lots of fun and adventures. I wouldn't trade my childhood for the world!

Patricia Gligor said...

John,
I hope you enjoy "Marnie Malone." :)

Patricia Gligor said...

Linda,
Thanks for stopping by! In addition to the house I grew up in, you should've seen my elementary school. It too was surrounded by woods and, more than once against my parents' instructions, I ventured into them. Boy, did I get in trouble when they found out.

Amy Reade said...

The way you describe your childhood home is evocative--how could you have grown up to be anything BUT a mystery writer?! There's just something about woods and cemeteries that invites mysteries.

Patricia Gligor said...

I agree, Amy. I guess you could say it was inevitable. Thanks for stopping by!

phann son said...

That first byline (no matter at what age) is a clincher. You had yours earlier than me, though I did make a news appearance at age 10 for my drawings

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