Saturday, November 22, 2014

Letting Go by Bestselling Author Nancy Pickard


How is it that we can sit down to write knowing only where our scene is set and who is supposed to be in it, and then before we know it characters say things we didn't even know they thought, and they do things we didn't know they could do, and things happen that totally surprise us?

How can that be? There's no logical explanation for it that I know of, or for the sense that we get of being in a trance when that happens. There we are, sitting down at our computer or notebook, and suddenly we look up and our senses come flooding back on us, and we realize we've been writing for two hours without even thinking about it. When writers talk about things like this, other people find it eerie. It is eerie, but it's wonderful to experience.

I think it happens because we have given ourselves over completely to our writing, a phenomenon that can't happen unless we let go.
But let go of what? Of our inhibitions, our fears, our need to control every syllable that goes on the page, and of such mundane things as telephone calls, email, and all the other distractions that take us out of the zone and pull us back into the world.

By practicing a lot small acts of letting go, a writer can build up her muscles for bigger ones. Every time she lets go in her writing, to whatever degree she can do it, the rewards can range from nice to incredible I started practicing it from the very beginning of my writing career, when I did "free writing" every day for ten minutes, setting a timer and writing nonstop, without editing or censoring, about any subject that popped into my mind.

Writer Cecil Murphey tells what happens when he lets go--"I was working on a book, and I must have gone into a zone because       the ringing telephone startled me. I felt as if I had been working in another  dimension. At least an hour had elapsed and it seemed like minutes. When that happens--and it's not an everyday occurrence--the writing feels effortless, and words easily fill the screen."
Letting go comes with risk and sacrifice. It may be "just" the risk of sacrificing your fear or getting more "out there" in what you write or letting yourself write a scene of violence or sex, or sweetness, or whatever it is that scares you to do. There are endless ways of letting go.

In my opinion, writers need to develop some tolerance for free falling, because that's how letting go feels--like Tarzan or Jane letting go of one vine without knowing for sure they can reach the next one. When--if--they do, there's a rush of exhilaration and pride, along with the knowledge that they've got to keep doing it in order to get better at it, so they can fly through the jungle with confidence.

Publishing--it's a jungle out there, right? Writers who can let go and allow themselves to become the high flyers they have the talent to be are more likely to navigate it successfully.

(Excerpted from Mysterious Writers, published by Poisoned Pen Press. Available in ebook and large print editions.)

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