Saturday, October 18, 2014

Writing a Book as Well as for TV


by John McFctridge

The TV program, "The Bridge,"  like my novels, is set in Toronto and  covers a lot of the same ground--cops and criminals. There are differences; my books follow members of the homicide squad (different cops in each book are main characters, and then they show up as minor characters in other books) and involve police procedure while also following the criminals (usually organized crime and drug dealers) and "The Bridge" is about a uniformed beat cop who is reluctantly elected leader of the police union and fights political corruption in the police brass and at city hall. "The Bridge" also has some police procedure.

There are similarities and differences in writing a book and a TV series.

When I write a book I begin with characters I think are interesting. In Everyone Knows This is Nowhere, I started with Sharon MacDonald, a single mother in her early forties (her daughter is twenty), an ex-stripper now running marijuana grow-ops in Toronto. She meets Ray, a mysterious guy who claims he has a lot of marijuana he'd like to sell wholesale but doesn't know where to start in Toronto. This gets Sharon and Ray involved with some of her old acquaintances in organized crime and brings in the police.

When I started the book, I only had a vague idea of where these characters would take me. But a TV show, I quickly discovered, is quite different. Every episode has to be outlined in advance of the writing and all the ideas approved by the "show-run"--in this case an excellent writer named Alan DiFiore, who wrote many episodes of a great Canadian show called "Da Vinci's Inquest," among others.

Every member of the story department is present and contributes to the episode outlines. Once every episode (in our case the two-hour pilot was aired as the first two episodes, so we were working on the next eleven), everyone contributes to the script outline and writing the scripts.

For a TV series, I think this is a great approach. It allows for character development over the whole season while at the same time each episode has its own story arc. With a TV series such as "The Sopranos," "The Wire," "Weeds," "Mad Men" and so on, taking on the season-long characters (and even story), TV series are becoming more like novels. The writing process is quite a bit different, but the basics--character, plot, theme--are the same.

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Canadian novelist and television script writer, John McFetridge, lives in Toronto and writes about organized crime. He also writes for the TV series, "The Bridge." His article was excerpted from Mysterious Writers published by Poisoned Pen Press.

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