Friday, September 12, 2014

Writing a Series

by Rhys Bowen

The truth is that the choice is often not ours to make. Many writers, including myself, find out that we’re writing a series when the publisher accepts the first book and asks, “Do you already have an idea for the next one?”

In fact most mystery writers get their start writing a series, and this has many advantages: you have a chance to build a readership over several books. You develop a presence on the shelves of the chain stores. You have a chance to develop an ever deepening relationship with your main character, rather like an ongoing friendship in which he or she reveals more and more interesting details about themselves and their pasts.

In many ways it's more comfortable to write a series. Each book starts with known facts, familiar characters, setting, subsidiary characters.

Of course there are disadvantages to writing a series: The biggest one is that you are stuck with your sleuth. Make sure you like him and find him interesting at the beginning. Agatha Christie came to loathe Hercule Poirot. You’re stuck with the environment. If you aren’t really fascinated with llama breeding, don’t make your sleuth a llama breeder. You’ll get mail from llama fanciers every day . You’l l be expected to go to llama shows and knit llama sweaters.

Certain crimes will never happen in your environment.

You are not free to try new approaches—alternating points of view, darker approach etc. Make sure you start off with the kind of book you want. If you start with a cozy series you can’t go dark in the middle, as I have found out. Your readers expect a certain type of book and will be angry if you change. My first Evan was deemed a cozy series. As I’ve come to know Evan better the books have become darker and meatier but they are still designated as cozy. There are some places I could never go with the stories. Likewise the readers of my Royal Spyness series expect to laugh and be entertained. They would be shocked by anything too dark happening.

And the last disadvantage: if the series becomes popular, you’ll be expected to go on writing it forever, which takes from you the chance to try something new. Or, as in my case, you want to try a new idea and find yourself juggling several books a year.It’s hard. A writer should be free to write whatever wonderful ideas come into her head, but writing these days is a business. I expect it always was. I expect Mr. Dickens’s publisher said to him, “Charlie, I told you, no regency romances.”
Bowen)

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Why Isn’t Reality Enough?


by Sandra Parshall

The next time you’re in the fiction section of a library or bookstore, take a moment to really see what’s around you. Each of those novels holds between its covers a distinct world that was created inside someone’s head.

Every year thousands of fictional worlds, inhabited by nonexistent people living out imaginary lives, are written, published and sold. The hidden hunger for made-up stories is insatiable—and unique. No other animal feels a desire, a need, to live simultaneously in the real world and in a wild variety of alternative, imaginary worlds.

Why do people have such a strong compulsion to tell and to hear, to write and to read, fictional versions of human experience? Why isn’t reality enough?

Reading fiction is usually seen as an escape from reality—so much so that some parents worry their children read too much and don’t spend enough time with other children. They feel their children will be isolated and fail to develop the people skills necessary to succeed in society. A series of psychological studies done over the past few years, though, should set the parents’ minds at ease. In every study frequent readers of fiction were more understanding of other people’s viewpoints, better at reading the moods of others and more open to new experiences. They suffered less from loneliness and social isolation than people who primarily read nonfiction.

Fiction has social benefits even when it’s not in print form and bound between covers. In a 2010 study of pre-school children, a team of psychologists found that the more fictional stories the kids listened to, and the more fictional movies they saw, the better able they were to understand other people’s viewpoints and beliefs. Watching television, however, didn’t provide the same benefits. The psychologists theorized that TV shows are too simplistic and don’t challenge the mind and emotions the way complex forms of fiction do.

We need stories in order to make sense of human life. While we’re immersed in a fictional world, we set aside our own beliefs and concerns and adopt the point of view of the protagonist. The two worst things we can say about any fictional character are: “He/she didn’t seem real to me” and “I didn’t care about the characters.”

Most of us don’t read fiction out of mere curiosity, to watch characters we don’t care about move through a series of events we can never accept in the fictional world. We want to understand it, however different it is from our own experiences. Understanding fictional events and people makes us more open minded in the real world.

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writers, where you read Sandra’s interview and learn more about her.)


Saturday, August 30, 2014

What a Character!


by Jinx Schwartz

How many times have we heard that phrase, what exactly does it mean, and how does it apply to my writing?

For starters, I have a lot of characters in my life. Not the ones in my books, but living, breathing characters, the kind defined by Webster as a person with many eccentricities. 

I admit that my lifestyle fairly screams for character encounters. We live half the year in Mexico’s Sea of Cortez, where cruisers abound from all over the world and and all walks of life. One thing they have in common is that they’re adventurous types who have chosen a life way outside the box. I can pick up enough material from one potluck on the beach (which happens at the drop of a hat) to fuel many a book. When in port, a walk down the dock or a beer at a local watering hole and I have new best friends from, well, everywhere. Tuning into the daily ham radio nets, with boaters checking in from all over Mexico and the Pacific Coast, with the tale of the day, has me jotting notes for future plots, or idiosyncratic scenarios.

And then there is the other half of my life, living smack dab on the Arizona/Mexico border. Not only do we make the headlines frequently, the city of Bisbee has been named by a national organization as one of the quirkiest places to live in the United States. And they are right. My gardener packs a .380 in his boot, my Zumba instructor is a retired, gay, exotic dancer; and my nearest neighbor is a Rottweiler who lives alone. Her owner shows up with food and water once a day and I give her lots of treats, but otherwise, she has the house and yard to herself most of the time. Rosa is an equal opportunity barker; she targets illegal crossers and border patrol agents with equal hostility. She’s the best dog I never owned.

Even my more normal friends, (you notice I used the word more) are great book fodder. When one of them was banned from the Kremlin because she set off the radiation detectors (she recently had a nuclear stress test), I filed that away, et voila, and it became part of a plot point in Just Deserts, fourth in my Hetta Coffey mystery series.

And then there is Hetta Coffey. She’s a woman with a yacht and she’s not afraid to use it. Okay, so she isn’t real, but boy, sometimes it doesn’t feel that way. Many of my readers actually think I am Hetta, or that Hetta is me. Since almost everyone says I am a real character, maybe we are one.

The plot thickens . . .

* * * * * * *
Jinx Schwartz was reared in the jungles of Haiti and Thailand, with return trips to Texas. She followed in her father’s steel-toed footsteps into construction and engineering in the hope of building dams. Finding all the good rivers taken, she traveled the world, and like the protagonist in her mystery series, Hetta Coffey, Jinx was a woman with a yacht and not afraid to use it when she met her husband, “Mad Dog” Schwartz. After their marriage they sailed under the Golden Gate Bridge and headed for Mexico. 

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writers, where you can read her amusing interview and learn more about her.)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Loren Estleman


Loren Estleman is one of the most talented writers I’ve ever known. As a young writer of both mysteries and western novels, his work often created bidding wars among competing publishers. Although his novels have been evenly divided between both genres since he began publishing in 1976, Loren’s cops have paid off much better than his cowboys.

“For me,” he said, “a good mystery places story and character ahead of all else, yet never loses sight of the simple truth that in order to be a mystery, a question must be asked. It needn’t be a whodunit, and might be something as simple and maddening as why the murdered man had three left shoes in his closet and no mates. If the writer has done his job well, the reader will forget the question as the story draws him in. But there had damn well better be a mystery involved if he’s going to call it one.”

Loren wrote six Amos Walker mysteries for Houghton Mifflin and nearly a dozen Double D Westerns before he was discovered by other New York publishing houses. His novels had been selling moderately well while critics raved about them. It wasn’t long before sales caught up with the reviews.

His biggest project was an in-depth look at the shootout at the O.K. Coral, a novel titled Bloody Season, which he wrote “without the blinders of folk-heroism.” He said, “If some cherished myths fell along the wayside, that’s secondary to my intention to examine the late Victorian morals at odds with a wilderness on the defensive.” Three major publishers expressed interest in the book before it was begun, with Bantam the winner in the bidding war. The novel was released in hardcover in 1988.

Loren had never been west of his home state of Michigan until he traveled to Santa Fe to accept a Spur Award from Western Writers of America. He had always been fascinated in the westward expansion, particularly the era he called “the death of the West, the period between the closing of the frontier and the beginning of World War I, when progress for good or ill was making its way westward.” He said there was then no place where a man could go to prove himself, or redeem himself, because the East had taken over the West.“There’s sadness and pathos to that period and locale that moves me to this day.”

Shy as a child and an avid reader, he remembered devouring the works of London, Poe, Chandler, and western authors O’Rouke, Short, and Shirreffs. He wrote his first short story after he was expelled from his high school band. A gangster yarn called “Mad Man Wade,” it returned with a printed rejection slip from Argosy magazine. Loren said he was “crushed, disappointed, and mad,” but he sat down and wrote another story. For years Argosy was the first magazine he submitted stories to “before it folded. I just wanted to crack it,” he said, “because that was the place to start.”

He worked as a news reporter for twelve years while writing his first novels. Eventually working as a police reporter in Detroit, he said, “I covered a lot of murder trials and manslaughters, and [the defendants] never quite looked like murderers. I’m not sure what one is supposed to look like, which is why the killers that I use in my mysteries, and sometimes in my westerns, tend to look like the guys you see mowing the grass down the street. They’re ordinary people, and we’re all potential murderers. That’s the theme in my writing that I work with.”

(Excerpted from my book, Maverick Writers)

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Dialogue Tags


by J. Michael Orenduff, Lefty Award winner and author of the Pot Thief mystery series.

Robert Parker was one of the most successful crime writers of all time, having penned almost 70 books in the Spenser, Sunny Randall and Jesse Stone series. He wrote 1,000 words every day, no more and no less. His many books in the pipeline led me to quip a year after his death that he had published more books dead than I had alive.

In a review of one of Parker’s books shortly before he died, I was surprised by the reviewer’s criticism of Parker’s reliance on ‘he said’ and ‘I said’ in dialogue. I had read all his books and never noticed an overuse of dialogue tags. So I grabbed a Parker off the shelf and started reading. The reviewer was right. Parker ended most of his sentences of dialogue with “he said,” “she said,” or “I said.” I was astonished that I had never noticed. I finally put it down to Parker’s prose being so good that he could get away with it.

If I could miss that in Robert Parker, I could miss it in my own writing.  So I reviewed my own use of dialogue tags. I found that I didn’t use them as frequently as Parker. But I did notice in my review of my dialogue that my most successful ones used fewer or no tags at all. In the time since I read that review, I’ve given a lot of thought to dialogue tags. I always notice them when I read. I have come to believe the best dialogue has no tags:

“I can’t believe this is happening to me.”
“It’s the restaurant syndrome, Hubie.”
“Restaurant syndrome? I’ve never heard of it.”
“Maybe you know it by its original name, le syndrome de restaurant.”
I groaned. “Please, no more French words and phrases.”
“But that’s it. That’s the syndrome. You start working in a restaurant, and you have to learn all those French terms. It begins to affect your thinking, like the twins thing.”
“The twins thing?”
“Yeah. You know, like how twins have this special language that makes it easy for them to communicate with each other, but it messes them up when they try to deal with normal people. Restaurant people are like that. We may start out normal, but after you begin using words like prix fixe, hors-d’oeures, a la carte, escargots, and raison d’etre, you get a little crazy.”
Raison d’etre?”
“I think it’s a raisin soufflĂ©.”

This passage is a conversation between my protagonist, Hubie, and his sidekick, Suzannah. The text makes it clear that they’re alone at a table in their favorite watering hole. How does the reader know the first speaker is Hubie? Because he is the one having problems. But even if the reader doesn’t make the connection, it is clear that Hubie is speaking because the response mentions him. I could have started the dialogue with, “I can’t believe this is happening to me,” I said. That would not be bad but I like it better without the tag. People don’t use dialogue tags when they speak, so keeping tags out of your dialogue makes it easier for the reader to fall into that perfect state when reading dialogue—thinking you are there listening to the characters.”

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writers, where you can read J. Michael Orenduff’s interview.)

Saturday, August 9, 2014

A Fat Manuscript is a Dead Manuscript


by Lois Winston

Whether you're writing mysteries or another genre, your manuscript needs a great story, great characters and great writing. The quality of the writing determines the difference between an acceptance and rejection. As a literary agent and author, I see too many submissions where the writer needs to place her manuscript on a diet.

Before you submit your manuscript, make sure it's not bloated with excess wordage that drags down the pacing and bores the very people you want to impress. Your writing must be crisp as well as succinct to catch an editor's or agent's eyes.

The Bloated Manuscript Diet:

1. Reread your manuscript. Is every scene essential to the plot, or goals, motivations or conflicts of your characters? Does each scene advance the plot or does it tell the reader something she needs to know about the characters? If not, the scene is filler, and you need to get rid of it. Each scene must serve a purpose. No purpose? No scene.

2. Repeat #1 for all dialogue. If the dialogue is nothing but chit chat, ditch it.

3. Do a search of "ly" words. Whenever possible, substitute a more active, descriptive word to replace an existing verb and the adverb that modifies it.

4. Instead of using many verbs to describe a noun, use one all-encompassing adjective or a more descriptive noun.

5. Say it once, then move on. It's not necessary to repeat an idea or image in different words in the next sentence, next paragraph or next page.

6. Identify needless words and eliminate them. Every writer has at least one or two pet words that need to be eliminated.

7. Avoid a laundry list of descriptions by substituting more descriptive nouns and adjectives.

8. Do a search for "was." Whenever it's linked with an "ing" verb, omit the "was" and change the tense of the verb.

9. Choose  more descriptive verbs and omit the additional words that enhance the verb.

10. Omit extraneous tag lines. If it's obvious which character is speaking, omit the tag.

11. Show, don't tell. Whenever possible, you want to "show" your story through dialogue and active narrative, rather than "telling" the story.

12. Let your characters' words convey their emotions, not the tag line. Also, keep to the unobtrusive "said" in tags. You can't grimace, laugh or sigh dialogue. The character can grimace, laugh or sigh before or afterward, but not while speaking.

13. Avoid non-specific things like "it" and "thing."

14. Describe body movements only when they are essential to the scene. Don't break up dialogue every other sentence with having your characters shrug, giggle, smirk, glance, nod or drum their fingers.

15. Don't fill dialogue with interjections. We might have the bad habit of filling our speech with "well" and "like" but having a character constantly adding those words makes for lousy dialogue.

(Excerpted from THE MYSTERY WRITERS,  now in print, ebook and audiobooks editions, which includes Lois Winston's interview.)

Saturday, August 2, 2014

A writer's unique voice


by Bruce DeSilva

Every writer speaks to you in a voice. When you read, you hear the writer talking to you. You may think you're reading with your eyes, but in a sense, you read with your ears. The writer's voice has everything to do with whether you enjoy the story, stick with it to the end, or ever want to read something else by that writer.

A few years ago, I asked Robert B. Parker, one of the most successful crime novelists of all time, why his books were so popular. He said, 'for the same reason people like certain songs. They love the way the language sounds.'

A lot of writers, even professionals, have trouble with voice, however. Why? We are bombarded with bad examples. We read a lot of poorly written stuff every day, and that can make us think that's the way writing is supposed to be.

We sometimes misunderstand our audience. No matter how many thousands of readers you may have, you must always speak to them one at a time. Never write as though you are speaking to a crowd. Reading, after all, is a solitary act.

The voices of the best writers are unique. You should be able to identify a passage written by Elmore Leonard or Laura Lippman, even if the name of the author is concealed.

How can you find your unique voice as a writer? For some of you, it's just a matter of sounding like yourself in print. You already have a voice. You just need to use it.

For others, finding your voice requires experimentation. It may sound counterintuitive, but I suggest that you begin by imitating writers you admire.

When I was starting out, I went through my Hemingway period. And my Raymond Chandler period. And my Hunter Thompson period.

Through this experimentation I was learning craft--the techniques these writers used to fashion their sentences and paragraphs. As my technical abilities grew, my own voice was able to emerge.

You've probably heard that you should write like you speak. Don't. Very few of us speak well enough to do that. Writing should feel like a good conversation but there are differences between written and spoken language. The most important ones are feedback.

If I say something to you, your reaction tells me whether I'm boring you or if you don't understand. In written language, I don't get that kind of feedback. so I have to provide it myself by reading my work out loud. Anything that doesn't sound good isn't good. No exceptions.
___________

A journalist for over 40 years, Edgar winning author Bruce DeSilva retired to write crime novels. He also served as a writing coach for the Associated Press and was responsible for training the wire service reporters and editors worldwide. The multi-award-winning writer also directed the elite AP department devoted to investigative reporting and other special projects.

You can read his interview in the book, The Mystery Writers, now in print, ebook and audiobook editions.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

A Golden Age of Writing


by Timothy Hallinan

I once knew a woman who translated hieroglyphics, and one of the texts she translated into English was one of the oldest poems known to man, dating from about 3000 BC. It was about how things were better before. It was a lament for having missed the Golden Age. It seems to be human nature to think in terms of lost golden ages. The operative word is “lost.” It’s not even fashionable to think that we’re living in a golden age.

I think we are. I think this is a golden age for mysteries and thrillers. Sure, some of the great ones are gone. Christie, Hammett, Chandler, Sayers, Tey, Highsmith,  McDonald, Stout, Parker and many others. But we have an enormous number of exceptional writers working now, and more titles to choose from than any other time in history. I’d put the best writers working today up against the best writers since Poe kicked things off. Who’s better than James Lee Burke, Sue Grafton, Louise Penny, Laura Lippman, S.J. Ronan, Lee Child, John LeCarre, Donna Leon? I could go on for pages—all of them writing right now.

I think this Golden Age has come about for three reasons. First, the ubiquity of relatively inexpensive books; until just a few years ago, despite all their moans and groans, the world’s publishers put out, in editions of varying costs, more books than in any time in history. And with all those books published, good writing usually found a champion.

Second, the durability of the genre. The mystery or thriller is one of the oldest genres, (What is “Oedipus Rex” if not a mystery?”) and one of the most universal. Mysteries and thrillers help readers work through some of the most difficult aspects of human existence. They present a world in which order, even though it’s been temporarily broken down, can be restored. They ignored the fashion of nihilism of despair that mars so much of supposedly “literary” fiction.

Third, women have come full circle. Once the royalty of the genre, they faded during the heyday of the pulps, the hardboiled noir and the five-testicle PI fiction of the ‘40s through the ‘60s. And then, starting in the ‘70s, the entire genre tilted, women reemerged with a vengeance, no longer confined to the classic and/or cozy end of the spectrum but ranging straight across from one extreme to another. 

And in one of the most remarkable shifts in modern marketing history, women became the driving force in mystery writing. So now we have women writing all kinds of books and also some of the best male writers who have ever worked in the genre. Jackpot. We’ve even seen the loosening (pretty much an abandonment) on what people write about, which has produced some terrible books but also some really serious explorations of the darkest corners of human behavior.

And now we’re seeing things open up even more widely. The ebook has broken New York’s stranglehold on what we can read—and what we can write, too. Once again, we’re seeing books that should have remained in people’s desk drawers, but we’re also seeing some tremendous stuff. It’s certainly opened things up for me. Like most writers, I’ve been restricted in what I could write because publishers would only buy a certain kind of book from me. But now I can write anything I want and put it out there to sink or swim.

I believe it’s a uniquely human experience to be frightened and amused at the same time. And I love writing books that attempt to put the reader in that position. 

But do I think Little Elvises and Crushed are Golden Age material? I doubt it—I can’t take myself that seriously. But they’re the product of a writer doing what he wants instead of what a corporation wants him to do, and in the long run that has to be good for everyone. When people look back on this particular Golden Age, I think they’ll say the emergence of the ebook both broadened and prolonged it.

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writerswhere you can read Tim’s complete interview.)

Saturday, July 19, 2014

So What are You Waiting For?


by Robert Liparulo (bestselling author whose books have been adapted to film.)

Write! Nothing takes the place of writing for learning the craft. Not formal education, not seminars or conferences or books about writing Not critique groups or deep conversations with like-minded friends, not studying the markets, not reading. All are valuable, but they're insignificant when compared to experientially learning how to get what's in your head on the page in a way that gets your ideas into another's head. 

Not everything you write will be or should be published but you have to rack up enough words to learn the craft to attract editors and eventually readers. In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell uses the Beatles and Bill Gates to validate "The 10,000-Rule," which says that highly successful people in any field have to put in 10,000 hours practicing their craft before they hit their stride or rise above the competition. The average full-time work year is 2,040 hours, so we're talking about five solid years of writing, and only writing. At 500 words per hour, that's 500,000,000 words committed to paper.

But let's be realistic and admit that telling a story is more than slamming out words. You have to think through a story, maybe outline it; research it, write it, then edit, revise and polish. If we give equal time to planning, researching, writing and editing, 10,000 hours still mean 125,000,000 words on page or screen.

The words can take any form of communication--personal letters, practice stories, blog posts, proposals, articles and short fiction published in magazines. (Sure, you can score some cash during this time; the Beatles were paid to play in Liverpool and Hamburg almost nonstop for three years while they honed their craft.) All of it moves you closer to the brass ring, a publishing contract or bestseller. 

Thing is, it's easy to fool ourselves that a pseudo-writing endeavor like attending a conference and  talking about writing is writing. It's not.

One million, two hundred and fifty thousand words! How far along are you? If you knew, really knew that upon reaching that figure (give or take some) you'd be the best of the best and no editor would dream of rejecting you, wouldn't you choose to write over doing those has-something-to-do-with-writing-but-isn't writing things? 

So what are you waiting for?

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writers, where you can read Robert Liparulo's interview as well as access his writing tips for fledgling writers.)

Saturday, July 12, 2014

Indie Publishing: the Good, Bad and the Ugly


by bestselling Canadian author Cheryl Kaye Tardif

In 2003 I began my career as a published novelist. Previously I had published smaller works--articles and poetry--in magazines, newspapers and one anthology. I then decided to go the indie route because I was tired of trying to get published and only getting rejection letters. It was the BEST decision I ever made.

My novel, Whale Song, was published in 2003, and it saw moderate success, along with two other titles, and I was able to hone my skills as an avid book marketer. I made the book signing circuit to bookstores in both British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. And I began marketing online as well.

In 2006 Whale Song was picked up by a small Canadian publisher and released in 2007. It sold well and surpassed 5,000 copies in sales, making the book a national bestseller. It was also on several Amazon bestseller lists: .com, .ca and .uk, which made it an international bestseller. However my publisher began experiencing financial difficulties along with other problems, and I pulled out. That was the "bad period" for me in my career.

In 2010 Amazon opened Kindle Direct Publishing to Canadian authors and I went back to my roots--indie publishing. For me it's probably the best fit. I am by nature very independent and a strong marketer. Plus, I'm an idea person. Even my former publisher saw this in me and often called me a "marketing guru" or "marketing genius." While I don't consider myself a genius, I do know that I'm a risk taker.

By 2012 I had nine ebooks published. Most have made bestseller lists along with eight trade paperbacks. I'm also published in another anthology, What Fears Become. And I've moved from bestselling author to publisher; a move that has surprised me yet is so rewarding that it's hard to explain. My company, Imajin Books, isn't like most publishers. We think ahead and out of the box.

I'm still technically indie published as I've published all my own titles, but Imajin authors are traditionally published. We pay them advances and regular royalties. And they are paid more than from most publishers. In many ways we treat our authors as though they were independently published. They have more say in their books, titles, covers and trailers. We think of them as partners, although they've put no money up front for publication of their titles. Like I said before, I'm a risk taker. 

During my career, I've seen the good, bad and the ugly. But I now see a wide window of opportunity. Those who go the indie publishing route will be successful if they have what it takes--marketing know-how and determination. What an exciting time to be in publishing, especially if you're an "idea person" like me. 

(Excerpted from the book, The Mystery Writers, where you can read Cheryl Kaye Tardif's interview as well as her guest blog. The book is now available in audio, print and ebook editions.)

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Using TV Techniques to Write a Killer Mystery


by Hank Phillipi Ryan, bestselling novelist and  award-winning journalist 

Here's what you need to produce a successful television story. Develop memorable characters. Build suspense. Show conflict. Tell a compelling story. Find justice. Change lives.


Here's what you need to become a successful television journalist. Never miss your deadline. Be fair. Get people to tell you things they wouldn't tell anyone else. Understand how the world works.Work with an editor. Create a brilliant and flawless product every time. Be completely devoted to your job.


As I began to write my first novel, I realized the number of parallels between writing for television and writing a mystery novel. Your primary focus is telling a great story, right? With compelling characters. And centering around an important problem. You dig for leads, track down documents, conduct intensive research, and see where the clues take you. You want the good guys to win, and bad guys to get what's coming to them. You want a satisfying and fair ending, and you want some justice. And if you're lucky, you get to change the world. 


Here's a new way of looking at your work as a journalist. And it doesn't matter if you've never written a news story in your life. 

You won't use every news story every day. Some you won't realize you need, until you do. On those days, there are journalism-based questions you can ask yourself to prod your brain into story telling--kind of a who-what-when-where-why and why-not that just might get you out of that pre-deadline panic.


Why do I Care?

If you're in a scene that seems to be flabby, or boring, or simply not compelling, there may be there's no reason to write it. Se your intention before you write the scene. What's the point of these next 200 words? Why do we care about these next 200 words? Why do we care about what's going to happen next? Figure that out. It may be that you're writing a scene that you don't need. You may be writing a scene that needs to move faster, or go a different direction, or wind up in a different place. 


Am I in the Right Place?

Not only the right place geographically, but the right place in time or space. If you've got two guys sitting around talking, or someone looking up a name on a computer, or talking on the phone, or if it's the fourth scene in a row that's taking place in an office--hmmm. Television is all about good video. Can you place your characters somewhere more cinematic? What would happen to your characters when you do?

Who said that?

Maybe you've got the wrong person talking, or using the wrong point of view. Placing the same scene in the point of view of a different person changes the perspective and as a result, shows you motivation in a different way. What's at stake in your scene? Who has the most to lose? Sometimes even thinking about a scene through a different character's eyes can open your own to different ideas.

What's the goal?

Are you at the beginning of the book where you need a big compelling hook? In the middle of the book where you need to twist and turn and keep the readers turning the pages? Or near the end, when you need to ratchet up the suspense and come up with the big finish or happy ever-after ending? Make sure you're clear on your goal. Think about what you should write to accomplish that.

(You can read more of Hank Phillipi Ryan's article as well as her  interview in The Mystery Writers.)

You can also learn more at her website: http://www.hankphillipiryan.com

Saturday, June 28, 2014

How to Care and Feed Your Author



by Vicki Hinze

Sounds silly? We’re talking soul food and emotional support. We’re talking about content authors. Hungry writers are not happy, which means those around them are also not happy. Not so silly, after all. Here are a few tips: Writers need time. Time to think, to dream, to study, to discover.  Show your support by giving them uninterrupted writing time. Don’t wait to be asked. Take the kids to the park or cook dinner.

If your author asks for a flash drive, don’t buy her a diamond. When a writer craves a tool and gets a bauble,  s/he’s disappointed.  It’s not a lack of gratitude. You buy the flash drive. You’re supporting the writer and the writing. You buy the bauble and you’re thoughtful but not supporting the writer or writing. Big difference.

Writers don’t talk to you about their writing or career challenges so you’ll solve their problems. You can’t solve the author’s problems and s/he doesn’t expect you to. Authors write through challenges, they talk through challenges, making sense of the jumble so they can slot those challenges, assign a value to them and press on. So just listen and let your author talk.

Authors not yet published crave tools to learn more about the craft, the business, the writing life.  But because they’re not earning, they feel they can’t justify the expense.  They feel guilty about spending “our” money for “my dreams” although logically they know these things are costs of doing business.  Show your support. Buy that writer a book on writing. Buy that writer “a magic pen” and tack on a note that says it’s a 100% guaranteed to be writer’s block proof.  Give that writer a homemade coupon for an hour of uninterrupted writing time. In other words, follow up well-meaning words with indisputable actions.  Watch that author bloom.

Authors get emotionally involved. If they didn’t, they wouldn’t be able to write because emotion is the means by which authors connect with readers. Emotional bonds are why, when reading a book the reader stops sees words on a page and begins living the story. That can’t happen if the writer isn’t emotionally involved. You can’t get out of a book what the writer doesn’t put in it. Right? So expect your author to emote, invest, to get involved and to care.  Maybe s/he doesn’t know anyone involved in a situation, but there are bigger issues at stake. Ones that relate, and those your author will write about with authority because s/he got involved.

Remember, for an author, everything is fodder. Writers take in that fodder, and they can’t turn it off.  It’s natural, like breathing. So if your author is devastated, or turned off by some event,  accept it. The writer is emoting. Authors do that.

Some inner-circle people will see an author weeping and turn around and walk out. Some will place an arm around him/her and say not a word.  Both are equally supportive, or can be. It depends on the specific author. And that’s the final tip.

Know your author. If you don’t know your author, then you don’t know how to support him/her. The greatest tip—and it truly is the greatest—is that if you don’t know what your author needs, ask. That’s absolutely priceless.

Too often writers who need support must feel the least able to ask for it. They get hit with unsolicited suggestions and unintended slurs about their “hobby.” When they started earning, or earning again, their attitudes change. But by then, they’ve learned to live without support,  or they’ve found it in other writers who understand. That can leave those closest to the writer feeling like outsiders,  and in a sense they are. But they need not be.

They only need to learn how to care for and feed their author.
You can learn more about bestselling author Vicki Hinze at her website: www.vickihinze.com


(This article was excerpted from The Mystery Writers.)

Saturday, June 21, 2014

How to Become Your Own Character



by Nancy Means Wright


Have you ever been in a play and tried to become the person you’ve been cast to portray?  If so, you’re probably familiar with the Stanislavski method: how to make your character believable through a recall of your own anger, envy or grief. And how to transfer that emotion, through words and action, through your onstage persona. 


I recall the struggle I was having to play Mrs. Hardcastle in Goldsmith’s “She Stoops to conquer.” I couldn’t get into the head of that foolish female until one evening my adolescent son drove my car into a snowbank, which made me late for a rehearsal, and his smirks and nonchalance turned me into that irritable, jaded mother.


The Stanislavski method works for fiction as well. As I write, I try to visualize each scene as though it’s onstage. I see my protagonist laugh, weep, shriek and strike out. I try to get into the heads of both villain and sleuth, for as Umberto Eco wrote regarding his classical mystery, The Name of the Rose, One must learn “to think and reconstruct in one’s own setup and act the scene aloud , switching characters off and on with hat, cane, whip or sword."And the technique of becoming one’s character works not only for the author, Eco allows, but should be “an experience for the transformation of the reader."

In my mysteries to date, I’ve morphed into a dairy farmer (I even learned to milk and birth a cow), and an adolescent sleuth (I had four offspring and seven grandchildren on whom to eavesdrop).  I’ve attempted to become both male and female secondary characters, and the real-life, conflicted Mary Woolstonecraft. The later has become my greatest challenge, for she lived in the 18th century and I have only my imagination as a time machine.
But in order to enter into the mindset of a character, one must also be familiar with the language and events of that person’s times. To be comfortable in Mary’s head, I read six biographies, her own writings; and most comfortable of all, her collected letters. As I read I could hear her voice sigh or sparkle in my inner ear. Novels by other period writers , along with long slow walks in Mary’s footsteps in Ireland, England, Paris, have all offered entry into her world.

Of course, 18th century buildings have been razed, ancient cobbles torn up, and even letters have telling omissions and unanswered questions. It’s here then that our writerly imagination comes into play, filling in the blanks, adding fiction into fact. In venting or reinventing a character: hearing, visualizing, dreaming him or her (I guarantee you will)—and finally becoming that sleuth—or that villain. 

As Shakespeare’s imprisoned Richard III exclaims, attempting (like the  writer) to create a link between his solitary self and the “populous” world: “Thus play I, in one person, many people.”

(Excerpted from The Mystery Writers)


You can visit Nancy Means Wright at her web and blog site: http://tinyurl.com/6voogsb. She’s also on Facebook.

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Deadline Istanbul


Peggy Hanson is an author who shares her love of international travel with her readers. The Peace Corps, Voice of America and teaching English have all played major roles in her life. Growing up in a series of small towns in Colorado, the daughter of a mountain-climbing Congregational minister and teacher, helped to mold her affinity for nomadism. 

She's lived for extended periods in Turkey, Yemen, India and Indonesia. Her first two books are mysteries in the Elizabeth Darcy series: DEADLINE ISTANBUL and DEADLINE YEMEN. She's currently working on the third in the series, DEADLINE INDONESIA, and is also compiling and editing her great aunt Mary's diaries, letters and pictures from 1888-1920 when she was a missionary, teacher and principal in the Balkans. The working title of the diaries is MISS MATTHEWS OF MACEDONIA and tells the of early feminism and a woman's bravery in the face of war.
Peggy has contributed travel articles to magazines in India and recently bean travel blogging for journeywoman.com and travelgogirl.com. Her most recent blog is entitled THE TURKISH DELIGHTS: Women to Travel With, Women to Love.

When time permits, Peggy leads groups of friends to Turkey. And she travels with her economist husband as well as with a group of close friends who call themselves "The Delights." Read the blog on travelgogirl.com to learn more about the group of amazing women!
Peggy lives near Washington D.C. with her husband and two energetic kittens. peggyhansonauthor.com


Peggy, tell us about your latest release, Deadline Istanbul. 

Elizabeth Darcy is in the world's most intriguing city to cover for old friend and fellow correspondent Peter Franklin, found dead in the Bosphorus. She's convinced it wasn't an accident. But uncovering secrets can be a dangerous business. Are spies involved? Criminals? Where does religion become politics, and vice versa? And wthat comfort lasts. ho are those men following her? Danger stalks her through the ancient streets. Elizabeth will be lucky to return safely to Washington. Fortunately, she has her  Jane Austen book and the cat Sultana to hold onto as long as 

Some reviews of the book include: "When journalist Elizabeth Darcy travels to Istanbul to investigate the death of a friend and colleague, she is quickly immersed in a Byzantine world of secrets and deception. Peggy Hanson's evocative description of this city of minarets and sultan's palaces is as vibrant and rich as a multi-colored Turkish carpet." - Ellen Crosby, author of Multiple Exposure 

"Deadline Istanbul introduces a smart, determined new detective, a newspaper reporter with a can-do spirit and a sense of humor. Istanbul itself, ancient and modern, filled with its own mysteries and contradictions, comes to life in Peggy Hanson's admirable novel."

Saturday, May 31, 2014

M. E. May's Ensconced




M. E. May lives in the Far Northwest Suburbs of Chicago with her husband, Paul, and their white Husky, Iris. Born in Indianapolis, she spent most of her years there or in a suburban town near there. Although, she has physically moved away, her heart still lives in her hometown. She has a son, daughter, and four wonderful grandsons living in central Indiana. She attended Indiana University in Kokomo, Indiana, studying Social and Behavioral Sciences. Her interest in the psychology of humans sparked the curiosity to ask why they commit such heinous acts upon one another. Other interests in such areas as criminology and forensics have moved her to put her vast imagination to work writing crime fiction that is as accurate as possible. In doing so, she depicts societal struggles that pit those who understand humanity with those who are lost in a strange and dangerous world of their own making.

In creating the Circle City Mystery Series, she brings to life fictional characters who work diligently to bring justice to victims of crime in the city of Indianapolis. Michele also hopes her readers will witness through her eyes, the wonderful city she calls her hometown.  

About her latest novel, Ensconced: Missing Person Detective and loving family man, Tyrone Mayhew, faces one of the toughest cases of his career–now a cold case he investigated ten years ago when Wendy Matherson and her vehicle vanished without a trace. New evidence has come to light and now Tyrone and his partner, Sergeant Benjamin Jacobs, must sort through years of old evidence and interview persons of interest and witnesses one more time. They soon discover that Wendy’s youngest son may be their best witness.

After years of nightmares, this young man is ready to try anything to pull the memories so deeply ensconced in his subconscious to the surface so he can finally be at peace with what happened to his mother. The more Tyrone digs, the more dangerous the investigation becomes. When Tyrone’s family is placed in mortal danger, it sparks Tyrone to work more diligently to discover what really happened the night Wendy Matherson disappeared. He must find resolution before this case tears Tyrone’s happy life completely apart.

Other titles by M.E. May:

Perfidy (Circle City Mystery, Book 1) – winner of the 2013 Lovey award for Best First Novel
Inconspicuous (Circle City Mystery, Book 2) – nominee for the 2014 Lovey award for Best Suspense novel.                                                                                           

You can learn more about Michele at www.memay-mysteries.com

Saturday, May 24, 2014

The Puzzle of Writing Mysteries


by Velda Brotherton

Wow, is writing mysteries ever puzzling. Some of my favorite authors write mysteries and I devour them, but it never occurred to me that I could actually write one. Then two characters tapped on my inner sanctum door and insisted I put them in a book. Tell their stories. I asked Dal Starr what he wanted to be in my book and he said in his Cherokee accent, "I'd like to be a deputy sheriff in a small town."

Well, maybe I could do that. On to Jessie West, who continued to stare at Dal and I don't blame her. He is hot. Anyway, this isn't supposed to be a romance, I don't think, so let's stop with the sexy glances. Jessie finally answered my question. "What else? A reporter on a small rural newspaper. Don't you know a lot about that?"

I replied that I did, having spent 19 years as feature writer, columnist and city editor for two of these small weekly papers. I never covered a murder though. The only one that happened while I worked for the paper was the killing of a Highway Patrolman out on the highway when he stopped two guys running from the law. There was no mystery there, and they were tracked down through the Ozarks on horseback and killed in a shack off in the wilderness.

But back to my visit with these two new characters in my life. Both Jessie and Dal informed me that while they'd like to solve a murder or two, doing it together might cause a bit of a problem. "Good," I replied. "Conflict is something we definitely need."

"And sex," Jessie said, casting another of her coy glances toward Dal, who dimpled when he grinned, a definite attraction. "Hey, a little sex mixed in with conflict would definitely be an asset to any story. Sometimes solving murders can get boring."

As an author of western historical romances, I knew all about hot love scenes, but I also knew that in the mystery and suspense genres hot love scenes would take on a different slant than in romances. But I could do that. I liked reading gritty mysteries with dark stories and a sexy man with a questionable past. These two appeared to fit the bill all around. Dal wouldn't say much about his past except that he'd been undercover in Dallas and had been shot on duty. Jessie was even more close-mouthed. She'd come back to her small Arkansas hometown after a big career in California that she didn't want to talk about. I'd get it out of her though, before the story got underway.

So my first mystery was born, but it took a lot of stops and starts to get a finished draft. Some drastic cutting because I had too many characters wandering around starting trouble that had nothing to do with anything. Finally I finished a decent draft that had gone by names such as Dry Bones, Dark Bones, etc. You understand the battle with titles. Then, when a small publisher asked me if I had something for their new line, which happened to be mysteries, I decided to get serious about my "Bones" story. Too many bones titles out there, and I needed something different.

Google helped me out and after reading several sites about Edgar Allan Poe, I decided to twist his titles and create a series for these two characters who continued to pester me with ideas. So the Twist of Poe series was born, and The Purloined Skull (The Purloined Letter by Poe) was contracted by Oak Tree Press and published in late 2013. The next story is written but needs a lot of work.

You see, I have this problem. When I read a mystery I cannot for the life of me figure out the killer or bad guy, so it's difficult for me to lay out the clues and the red herrings. I have to work extra hard after my story is written planting those things that will help the reader figure out the killer. But I'll get there and The Tell Tale Stone will soon be submitted. Hey, this mystery writing is a fun break from writing romances, and I snuck in some pretty sexy love scenes in the appropriate places.

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Velda Brotherton writes of romance in the old west with an authenticity that makes her many historical characters ring true. A knowledge of the rich history of our country comes through in both her fiction and nonfiction books, as well as in her writing workshops and speaking engagements. She just as easily steps out of the past into contemporary settings to create mysteries and women's fiction which she prefers to set in her home state of Arkansas. Tough heroines, strong and gentle heroes, villains to die for, all live in the pages of her novels and books.



Saturday, May 17, 2014

A Bad Reputation


There She is by Jane Tesh

When I was rewriting the first Madeline Maclin mystery, A Case of Imagination, I needed something for Madeline aka Mac to be besides a struggling PI.  In earlier drafts of the story, she’d actually been a man, but my agent at the time suggested I change Mac to a woman because during that time, the mystery field had opened up for women protagonists in a big way.  Original Mac had been a con man, but I didn’t want New Mac to be a con woman.  Instead, I gave that character trait to her boyfriend and soon to be husband, Jerry Fairweather, who’d been Original Mac’s best friend.  Looking around for something interesting, I decided that New Mac, now known as Madeline, would be a former beauty queen.

Pageants are a big deal in the South, and many of my gay men friends were involved with local and state pageants, so I had an inside track to what went on behind the scenes.  I think it’s fine if women are old enough to decide for themselves about being in pageants, but I have my doubts about the Little Miss stuff, especially the so-called glitz pageants, where little girls are dolled up to look much older and creepily sexy.  I decided that Madeline’s mother pushed her into those ghastly child pageants for many years, and now Madeline has an uphill battle to prove she’s more than just sequins and a tiara.  I also decided she could be an artist, trying to work her way past some cutting criticisms.  Being an artist comes in handy in Madeline’s latest case, A Bad Reputation

Having to change a character so much taught me a lot about compromise.  In the end, New Mac is a stronger and more interesting character than Original Mac, and Jerry, who was basically just a straight man for his friend, now has his own problems to solve and a background filled with shady friends who are always popping up at the wrong times to add more drama to the stories.  Madeline is not above using some of Jerry’s special skills, such as picking locks and getting into houses, and both of them can tell when someone’s smile is not sincere, especially Madeline Maclin, Miss Parkland. 

Summary of the Plot: In A Bad Reputation, wealthy Wendall Clarke decides to renovate an old building on Main Street and open an art gallery in Madeline and Jerry’s small town of Celosia, North Carolina, causing the local Art Guild to go into orbit.  Wendall’s past reputation as a show-off isn’t helping his cause, and there’s something iffy about his new wife, Flora. Wendall’s ex-wife, Larissa, resents this newer, younger, blonder wife, and members of the guild are fighting over whose art work goes in the gallery first.  Someone even heaves a brick through the gallery’s front window.   Then Wendall is found dead behind the gallery, and Madeline takes the case.

However, Madeline has a couple of other concerns. Honor Perkins, one of Jerry’s friends from his con days, is playing tricks around town.  Honor says she wants Jerry back in the game, but Madeline can tell what Honor really wants is Jerry back in her life.  
And Madeline’s been feeling odd lately, particularly in the mornings.  She refuses to believe she’s pregnant.  A baby is not in her plans!
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Jane Tesh is a retired media specialist and pianist for the Andy Griffith Playhouse in Mt. Airy, NC.  She is the author of the Madeline Maclin Mysteries, featuring an ex-beauty queen turned detective and her con man husband, and the Grace Street Mysteries, featuring PI David Randall and the many Southern characters who live at 302 Grace Street.

My links are website: www.janetesh.com